Poets on poetry writing activities

Theresa Broemmer Theresa Broemmer lives in mid-western Illinois with her husband and two children. She has a masters degree in education, and she spent five years in the early childhood field before deciding to stay at home with her children and concentrate on a writing career. She writes poetry, children's stories, and adult drama.

Poets on poetry writing activities

On this particular March day inTheodore Facepaint, who was nine years old, agreed to do a parody. With hand balanced on hip and the left leg slightly in front of the right, my newly found friend positioned himself on Sand Hill before turning to face the hazy afternoon sun.

This was a pose we had become familiar with: When I projected the image of the color 35 mm slide onto the wall last week I remembered the sense of mirth in which it was taken. Yet somewhere slightly north of where we were clowning around, Grandmother was uprooting medicinal roots from the sandy soil and placing them inside her flower-patterned apron pockets to thaw out.

Twenty-nine years later, if I look long enough, existential symbols are almost detectable. The direction of the fiery sun in descent, for example, is considered the Black Eagle Child Hereafter.

Could I be seeing too much? Past the west and into the Grandfather World? When I look closely at the background of the Indian Dam below—the horizontal line of water that runs through the trees and behind Ted—I also know that Liquid Lake with its boxcar-hopping light is nearby.

For Ted and his Well-Off Man Church, the comets landed on the crescent-shaped beach and lined themselves up for a ritualistic presentation. For Jane Ribbon, a mute healer, a seal haunted this area.

But further upriver is where the ancient deer hunter was offered immortality by three goddesses. While the latter story of our geographic genesis is fragmented, obscuring and revealing itself as a verisimilitude, it is important. Ted and I often debated what we would have done had we been whisked through a mystical doorway to a subterranean enclave.

Ted, unlike the ancient hunter who turned down paradise, would have accepted— and the tribe never would have flexed its newborn spotted wings. But the question being asked today is, Have we kept anything?

poets on poetry writing activities

Our history, like the earth with its abundant medicines, Grandmother used to say, is unfused with ethereality.

In me, in Ted, and everyone. Stories then, like people, are subject to change. More so under adverse conditions. They are also indicators of our faithfulness.

She was also attuned to the fact that for generations our grandparents had wept unexpectedly for those of us caught in the blinding stars of the future.

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Mythology, in any tribal-oriented society, is a crucial element. Without it, all else is jeopardized with becoming untrue. Most fabled among the warnings is the one that forecasts the advent of our land-keeping failures.

Many felt this began last summer when a whirlwind abruptly ended a tribal celebration. From the north in the shape of an angry seagull it swept up dust.

At the last second the whirlwind changed direction, going toward the tribal recreation complex. Imperiled, the people within the circus tent- like structure could only watch as the panels flapped crazily.

A week later, my family said the destruction was attributable to the gambling hall, which was the actual point of weakness of the tribe itself. Which is to say the hill where a bronze-eyed Ted once stood is under threat of impermanence. By allowing people who were not created by the Holy Grandfather to lead us we may cease to own what Ted saw on the long-ago day.ProTeacher!

Poetry lesson plans for elementary school teachers in grades K-6 including point of view, imagery activities, programs and thematic units, metaphor and simile skills curriculum, classroom and teaching ideas resources.

This is a great little reference book to use for inspiration and expansion of your writing skills. Go through it in order, or jump around to what lessons catch your eye or pique your interest. A Jocelyn Ajami | David LaRue Alexander | Bruce Amble | Doreen Ambrose-Van Lee | Gwen Ames | Michael Eddie Anderson | Candace Armstrong | Elana .

The Academy of American Poets is the largest membership-based nonprofit organization fostering an appreciation for contemporary poetry and supporting American poets.

Poets on poetry. Listen in as acclaimed children's writers like Marilyn Singer, Ashley Bryan, Jack Prelutsky, Mary Ann Hoberman, Nikki Grimes, and Janet Wong talk about reading poetry aloud and writing poetry. We want kids excited about writing! The National Schools Project, initiated in , is designed to share our youth’s talents with others, supply a national audience for student writing, and provide a publishing opportunity for young poets.

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